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The Future of Architecture and Engineering: A Q&A with STD-företagen Managing Director Magnus Höij


Magnus Höij
MagnusHöij
Managing Director
Swedish Federation of Consulting Engineers and Architects

In an industry centered around innovation, the question always remains – what’s next? 


StockholmTo help answer this, we’ve launched a series of blog posts exploring the past, present, and future trends in architecture, engineering, and construction consultancies. Over the next few months, follow along with us as industry leaders share their thoughts.

In this post we spoke to Magnus Höij, Managing Director of the Swedish Federation of Consulting Engineers and Architects (STD-företagen) headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden. Magnus joined the Swedish Federation of Consulting Engineers and Architects in 2014. He was previously editor-in-chief for several publications, including Computer Sweden and Internet World, covering topics on IT and online services. He has great interest in the technology, marketing, organization, and personal skills needed to make a successful business and has penned several books on IT and business.

Q: What do you think is the most significant trend that will impact the future of the AEC industry in your region over the next 5 years?

A: Globalization and digitalization will probably be two the trends that we will talk a lot about and that will have big impact for our industry. The processes and legal frameworks will be increasingly global, which will lead to a global market for expertise and knowledge. Digitalization will not only help us work more efficiently, we will be able to construct new things and we will be able to participate in the dialogue with customers and other constructors in the building process even more than today.

Q: How do you see the current role of AEC firms shifting, what do you think is causing that shift, and how must AEC firms react to survive?

A: The need for innovation in the world of construction and infrastructure is huge. As companies, we need to meet this need with a higher degree of new and provocative ideas, based on our deep understanding of the technological framework. But we also need to bring in new perspectives from not only engineers, but also architects, behavioral scientists, statisticians, political analysts, etc. in order to tie these trends and insights together.

Q: Knowing what you know today, are there things you would or could have done differently to prepare for or react to the Global Financial Crisis of 2008? Are there things that you are doing differently now because of the GFC? How have you evolved your processes or policies post-GFC?

A: I wasn’t in this industry at that time. However, I think that our industry is working with issues that could in many ways be needed to avoid this kind of crisis. A good infrastructure is a foundation of a modern society. Without it, the society is more vulnerable. Our ability to tell that story to politicians and decision makers will also determine how well we will manage the next financial crisis.

Q: What is the biggest challenge you are currently tackling within your firm or association?

A: Our ability to adopt to the rapid changes in the marketplace. Our companies are quickly becoming both more global, crossing borders to other industries and facing challenges from totally new players in the market. As an organization, we need to keep up with these changes, understand the new landscape, and try to lead the way for the industry in to the future, not be dragged there.

Q: How has your office environment changed, and how is your firm continuing to evolve your workplace environment, procedures, and technologies, to accommodate the evolving demands of the incoming millennial workforce? What considerations and changes are you making regarding collaboration, efficiencies, work/life balance, technologies, etc.?

A: The most important part of taking care of younger staff is about leadership. We must make sure that each and everyone can find his or her best way to contribute. Teamwork is so important in the modern work life. That could, in part, be done by adding new tools, hardware, physical planning of the office, work hours, etc. But everyone is unique in so many ways, that each leader must be able to adapt to each situation. Investing in leadership skills is priority 1, 2, and 3.

This post is part of a question and answer series with global industry leaders on the future of the architecture, engineering, and environmental consulting industries.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Magnus Höij Magnus Höij is the Managing Director of the Swedish Federation of Consulting Engineers and Architects (STD- företagen) headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden. Magnus joined the Swedish Federation of Consulting Engineers and Architects in 2014. He was previously editor-in-chief for several publications, including Computer Sweden and Internet World, covering topics on IT and online services. He has great interest in the technology, marketing, organization, and personal skills needed to make a successful business and has penned several books on IT and business.

Magnus Höij

Managing Director

Swedish Federation of Consulting Engineers and Architects

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