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Move Over Millennials, Introducing Generation Z


Evelyn March
EvelynMarch
Group Director
BST Global

Just when you learned to spell Millennials without a spellchecker, there's a new group emerging and entering the marketplace: Generation Z.

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First Comes Diversity, Then Comes Inclusion

Evelyn March
EvelynMarch
Group Director
BST Global
In our micro-diverse society, many companies strive to mirror their peers, their clients, and the world at large. Creating a diverse work environment hones in on the cultural mix of experiences and acumens that team members bring. But after you've onboard this diverse community of talents, then what? The path to excellence I'm sure we all have a former teacher that made a statement that gave us an aha moment. Mine was my high school English teacher who memorably said 'Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success.' That quote sums up the path to excellence and defines inclusion. Good companies market diversity and inclusion, great companies create a competitive edge by decoupling and then living the two. After bringing together a diverse staff, a company must define inclusion to forge the path to excellence. What's the difference? Inclusion integrated the myriad of individuals into one workplace – seamlessly and individually. Why is inclusion so important? People from diverse backgrounds challenge each other more. Challenge begets creativity. Creativity begets profitability. Getting it right first with diversity allows a company to peel back the corners of the world and how it may interact with your product through the eyes of your employees. Inclusive workplaces that create forums for individual contribution outperform competition and enjoy longer employee retention. The generations entering the workforce are raised believing it's unnecessary to downplay their differences in order to get ahead. They are proud of their differences and refuse to check them at the door. A Deloitte survey revealed that 86% of Millennials feel that differences of opinion allow teams to excel. Moreover, lack of inclusion can lead to a lack of engagement. And that affects a company's bottom line as disengaged employees cost companies up to $350 billion per year in lost productivity. Inclusion requires planning For many, inclusion is synonymous with chaos. But, it doesn't have to be. A forum for employee collaboration does require commitment and planning, but the reward is worth the investment. Align each position with the company's success. Every team member is essential. Understand where their insight is paramount and create the forum to extract their feedback. Create model leadership. Train your leaders to model ethical behavior. Accept input, admit mistakes, and express genuine concern for all staff members. Redefine ethics. Is your code of ethics a statement you expect from your employees or does it define what your employees can expect from you? Inclusion views ethics as bi-directional. Commit to training. First management, then employees. A corporate culture that creates standards on how to raise issues and resolve them and the consequences for deviation are setting themselves up for successful inclusion. If you're desiring the mix of employee engagement, reduced turnover, a clear picture on global outreach and increased profits – understanding your stance on inclusion may be your answer. Where do you stand on your inclusion policy? Let us know in a comment below.

Creating a Culture Mix of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation – And Who is Responsible?

Evelyn March
EvelynMarch
Group Director
BST Global
Let’s face it, there are countless articles in print and cyberspace that gives insight to the growing concern of tenure and turn-over. So, what really motivates employees to stay? Companies are adopting and promoting their extrinsic rewards as a reason to ‘work here’. Great pay, great healthcare, flexible spending accounts. Some companies have expanded their offerings to perks like gourmet meals, endless snacks, and on-site baristas. The package of extrinsic tangible rewards are appreciable motivators. However, even with such great extrinsic motivators, companies like Google are still experiencing a high level of turnover. A survey on employee tenure for the companies on the Fortune 500 list showed Google at number 462 with an average tenure of 1.1 years. On the other side, an article in Business Management Daily featured Synergis Technologies and its 108 employees have been with the organization for an average of 10 years. What’s the secret ingredient in Synergis’ secret sauce? The company’s core value mantra includes innovation. Employee innovation that is. The intangible intrinsic motivation of creative contribution is what makes it a bit harder to part ways. Who moved the cheese? Years ago when industrialization had taken the world by storm, work was primarily routine and guided by policy and procedure. Under that model, the extrinsic reward system were the motivators of the times. Today’s workforce is asked to employ critical thinking and problem solving in their daily tasks. These scenarios are not easily definable in a written manual. The freedom to express one’s creativity – that will in turn catapult the company in the marketplace – is a healthy, highly rewarding intrinsic motivator. With this change in landscape, it is imperative to see that extrinsic and intrinsic motivations are dually important in achieving successful employee engagement. Who's on first? Reading from a tattered corporate playbook, Human Resources is usually the kicker pulled off the bench to score the extra three points that scores the win for employee engagement. Though excellent in developing the extrinsic reward program, are they the best players to develop the intrinsic motivators required to keep employees engaged? Reviewing several companies studying the other side of the coin, they decided the answer is no. While invested in providing the talent for the company, they’re not necessarily engaged in the intricate details of the delivered product. The group that has come to the rescue is marketing. The marketing team is responsible for understanding what your customer needs, and why you and your product are the best choice to fulfill. Creating a two-way branding schema strengthens the allure of the company’s brand to both the receiver and deliverer. Do your employees really know what you do? Quality Bicycle Products, a Minneapolis company dedicated to bringing innovative ideas to the biking community understood that it was important to align the internal and external messaging of its values.  To foster the idea that we need to change our environmental footprint to its 185 employees, QBP offers a $2 per day credit to employees living within ten miles who choose to bike, bus or carpool to work. The marketing of an eco-friendly alternative to transportation was also marketed internally. Employees now feel that they are the greatest contributors to the company’s sustainability endeavors. Nike is best known the slogan ‘Just Do It’. Consuming their brand gives you the power to persevere. Whether you’re a cashier or an engineer, your intrinsic motivation to deliver that message is conveyed through corporate storytellers that act as internal marketers. Its rich heritage is conveyed through the stories of how Coach Bowerman created better running shoes for his team by pouring rubber into the family waffle iron, and that was the birthplace of the iconic Nike waffle sole. These stories of innovation provide archetypes that employees can pull from to create their own motivation toward greatness. These are just a few. Others like Starbucks, Disney, and IBM have great stories around creating intrinsic motivation by including the external branding to the internal teams. Creating a Success Story Balancing the two motivators is really about timing. Intrinsic motivation is inspired, not taught.  During the onboarding, introducing your product to your employee as you would your customer excites the intrinsic mind to work toward achieving a purpose. Continual sensory feeding is necessary to reignite the motivated employee. As you change your branding strategy are your employees engaged? Are they invested in the latest and the greatest that the outside world sees? When logos change and branding changes, are the employees also engaged in experiencing the change?  Are you taking full advantage of your extrinsic and intrinsic reward system to create the best employee experience? What motivators do you use at your firm? Tell us more in a comment below!

Does Corporate America Hold the Key to Education Reform?

Evelyn March
EvelynMarch
Group Director
BST Global
We live in a time where shift happens. And it’s happening at an alarming rate. In 1900 human knowledge doubled every 100 years. In 1945 it doubled every 25 years. In 2014, it doubled at the rate of every 13 months. It is projected that by 2020, it will double every 12 hours! Every day, over 5.4 billion Google searches are launched. This is 100 times greater than the year 2000. The number of text messages sent daily double the number of humans that occupy our planet. The shift of knowledge is happening at an exponential rate. And our educational system is trying hard to fill the gap. From 2000 to 2014 the enrollment in undergraduate studies rose by 31%. Computer science, business, and engineering topped the list of studies – all the careers suited to conquer this shift in the paradigm. Yet according to a recent Forbes article, there are 4 million job openings that remain unfilled. While college campuses are revamping their majors to answer the jobs of the present and future, there remains a disconnection. Higher education prepares students for the hard skills to perform the job, yet employers are seeking soft skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, and proficiency in writing to complete the job. Coupled with that, employers may be missing that one in every five people own a smartphone which changes the criterion for how one communicates. According to a recent article on CareerBuilder, 86 percent of active candidates begin their job search on a mobile device, and 70 percent of those want to apply the same way. Not optimizing the node of communication for recruiters can potentially result in a loss of bright talent. Is there a lack of collaboration between businesses and educational institutions? If the two partnered to better define the starting and ending points and amalgamated ideals to create the road to success, what heights can we reach? For centuries we have put the ownership of career preparation on the educational system without including the desired outcome. Think of it this way – no one sets out to make a marinara sauce without an expectation that the tomatoes they buy are full of flavor.  Or, purchases a pallet of bricks without complex plans that defines the exact outcome of the house it will build. The misnomer of not teaching human capital skills at the secondary school level and beyond is fast becoming the lynchpin that is slowing corporate profits. The hard skill of education has been exemplar in the cornerstone of creating gender equality, reducing poverty, fostering peace, and creating a sustainable planet. Adding the soft skills of communication, leadership, influencing, creativity, and professionalism creates the new educational currency that maintains economic competitiveness and creates prosperity. Education and human capital are essentially inseparable in the definition of success – making a company’s human resource contribution the profit driving game-changer. In the workforce, sharing and collaborating is paramount to success. Yet in the educational system, discussion and partnering is deemed cheating. We have to recognize this oxymoron and make the changes that can and will foster success. Businesses that are willing to step into the community and offer reciprocity of soft skills for hard skills at the earliest working age are seeing that they can possibly close the educational gap.  It is recognized that the generation following millennials will shape the data that is projected to increase two fold daily.  While providing the opportunity to learn hard skills, in exchange these businesses are gaining insight to forthcoming trends allowing it to set its own course of exploration.  Incorporating things such as team projects, open discussion meetings and idea sharing teaches the much needed collaborative soft skills that benefit both the company and the individual. For those entering the work force, this soft skill offering creates the necessary upward mobility that turns today’s employees into tomorrow’s leaders. Have you implemented a training program that successfully bridged the educational gap? If so, we’d love to hear your ideas!

Partnership: Simple, But Not Easy

Tom Kahl
TomKahl
Chief Financial Officer
GEI Consultants
On the surface, partnership seems easy. We come to work to solve common problems and it’s more efficient to work together. In practice, things aren’t so straightforward. Are you doing all you can to be a good partner? As professional service providers, we’re not here to make people do things. We’re here to help them get work done. This takes collaboration. And, this means being a good partner. Tackling the obstacles to partnership is paramount to success today and in the future. Now is the time to break through the partnership resistance force fields. But, what are the obstacles to partnership? Bullies, Narcissists, and Cynics. These people are the number one reason partnership doesn’t work. (A Stanford professor wrote a book about this!) These are the individuals who are habitually self-serving and always steer discussions back to their own interests, needs, whims, and hang-ups. They are un-satisfiable, unchangeable, unpredictable, and constantly focused on other’s perceived shortcomings. They believe they are among a courageous minority that “tells the painful truth.” And, they are tolerated in surprising numbers because of a “magic” they have with clients or some other skill set with perceived value. Imagine what could happen if you removed all of the bullies from your firm: productive meetings, broadly supported solutions, and energy focused externally! This may seem like a fantasy, but if you concentrate on what you gain instead of what you lose, it’s entirely possible. Lack of Trust. A lot of issues with trust stem from the unknown. How easy is it to trust partners you work with remotely and cannot see? Do staff need to “earn” trust individually and incrementally? Is there a test? Who gets to make that decision? Do some staff simply declare lack of trust in others to opt out? You don’t need to build trust. A better approach? Assume trust. Then deal with the exceptions. Put the responsibility of trustworthiness on each other and focus management attention on the breaches of trust. If you don’t, you will be in an endless paradigm of questions. How can I be a good partner? It’s all well and good to say get rid of all the bullies, but what else can you do to make a difference? Treat your employees like internal clients. Adopt a problem-solving mindset, not a compliance mindset. Trust that staff are trying to do the right thing, as best they understand. Climb into the ring and spend time understanding what all parts of your business do. Make the “right way” to do things also the easy way to do things with regard to systems and processes. In professional services firms, the currency of the land is client relationships. And to be successful, it’s imperative that we are good business partners. It’s time to take away the excuses. What obstacles to partnership have you experienced at your firm? Tell us more in a comment below! Author’s note: This post is the second of two and is based off of my keynote presentation for the BST Global PowerUp 2016 Annual Users Conference.     

Are You a Good Partner?

Tom Kahl
TomKahl
Chief Financial Officer
GEI Consultants
In 1970, a decision maker would have said “I need an expert to tell me what to do.” Today, it’s “I need experts who understand my business, who I want to work with, and can get me a solution.” There has been a shift in the professional services business paradigm and because of it, being a good partner is more important than ever before. Technology has made it easier to learn and become informed. People are educated. Clients are educated. Service providers are educated. When looking to start a new project, we seek more than just hiring the team with the most impressive portfolio. It’s about finding the people who best fit what we want to do – it’s about finding good partners. Partnership is not a new concept. But, it is the key organizing principle of our time and it’s time your professional services firm takes notice. So, what is partnership exactly? Partnership happens when we: Work to seek common understanding Put common interests ahead of factional interests Do the “right thing” because we owe it to each other in service to our common interests It’s this third point–doing the right thing–that extends partnership from simply a good behavior to an organizing principle and ultimately into a cultural attribute of an organization. If everyone in an organization does things because they owe it to each and not because they have a stick at their back, it makes life easier. You just trust that people are trying to do the right thing and getting it done. Why is partnership an organizing principle? In short, differentiation. There was a time when professionals had a monopoly on knowledge, information, and skills. Now, you come into contact with people who are self-educated and have endless opportunities to learn from the Internet. People no longer seek firms out as an exclusive purveyor of knowledge. They are coming to you because they need collaborators and they need somebody who can help solve their problem. The value of work comes from getting to the optimal solution, which requires seeing the challenge from your partner’s perspective. In my grandparent’s age, the world with regards to professionals was driven by awe. Their world was one where they trusted implicitly. Ministers, teachers, doctors, lawyers – they knew what my grandparent’s didn’t know and they took them for their word, case closed. Even my parents are reluctant to ask questions of their doctors. Me? When I visit a doctor, I am asked what I think the problem is. We talk about it and then collaborate around a solution. I find that more productive and satisfying. This is the paradigm for all professional services now. Most professionals and clients want, as much as anything else, to work with good collaborators. And the ones who embrace this set themselves apart. Plus, partnership extends to everyone– clients, employees, and colleagues. As a firm, you seek to attract the right kind of employees and the right kind of clients to join your organization. With partnership set as an organizing principle you can expect your partners to do the right thing because it is embedded in the culture of the organization. And, that’s attractive to clients and recruits. I probably didn’t tell you anything you didn’t already know, but I hope to have laid the framework for a guiding principle you can take back to your firm. Of course, implementing a culture of partnership has its challenges. In my next post, I’m going to explore obstacles to partnership and what you can actually do to be a good partner. Does your firm embrace collaboration and partnership already or do you have room to grow? Tell us more in a comment below! Author’s note: This post is the first of two and is based off of my keynote presentation for the BST Global PowerUp 2016 Annual Users Conference.   

Consumerization of Software: Mega Trends That Will Transform Your Consultancy

Javier Baldor
JavierBaldor
Executive Vice President
BST Global
“If I spend so much of my day using these enterprise software products, why are they so difficult to use?” If you’ve heard (or said) this before, you aren’t alone. There is a technology and design shift underway called the Consumerization of Software and it’s impacting our expectations surrounding software and the way we do business. Earlier, I kicked off our blog series on transformative trends with some statistics about the Millennial workforce. Today, I want to shed some light on a concept called the Consumerization of Software. Over the next few months, follow along as we take an in-depth look into more developments that will affect the future of the architecture and engineering industry, both tomorrow and beyond. Trend TWO: CONSUMERIZATION OF SOFTWARE Here’s the issue: many of the enterprise software solutions used by engineering consultancies today are often cumbersome and hard to use. That’s because in most instances, the systems were designed fifteen to twenty years ago – without the context of widespread internet and smart phone usage. These outdated interfaces offer distinctly different user experiences when compared to the modern applications of today. Not surprisingly, this does not make users happy. WHAT IS THE CONSUMERIZATION OF SOFTWARE? Simply put, the Consumerization of Software is all about making things easier. Think about your own life. At home, we use mobile apps to connect with loved ones, manage our grocery lists, and even order pizza. Why? Because they make our lives easier. They save us time and money. Our workforce is now coming to the office with that same ease-of-use mindset and because of this, we have seen a shift in expectations around software. Your employees want intuitive, usable, and beautifully designed applications. And they don’t just want them in their personal lives, they want them professionally. Software today must meet the standards of user experiences that engineers have in their everyday lives--think about popular fitness apps, banking apps, or even parking apps. Systems design is steering away from the overly complicated and moving toward the user-friendly, and much of this will be driven by Millennials. What DOES THIS MEAN FOR BUSINESS COMPUTING? In short -- Big change. In 2012, Future Simple CEO Uzi Shmilovici shared 3 predictions on the future of enterprise software: A new class of enterprise software will emerge — As new user experience paradigms become more prevalent, a new generation of business software will transpire. With a strong focus on user experience and making software usable for more than just managers, but end users themselves, this new generation of software will take hold quickly and provide a lot of value for a fraction of the cost. We will see a dramatic shift in discovery channels — Today people find new apps via social media, peer recommendations, search, or through their app store. There’s no need for a special committee to choose the right software when you can rely on credible ratings and recommendations. Many traditional vendors will fail to adopt—The truth is that it is not easy to adapt when you are sitting on top of a complex legacy code that barely runs in a modern browser, let alone on a new device. And, many vendors simply won’t make the investment. Fast forward four years after those predictions and one thing is certain--the future is here and there is still work to do. According to a 2016 Tech Pro Research survey, 44% of respondents say UX is lacking with enterprise software when compared to consumer software. Yet, even Gartner asserts that “competitive advantage hinges on exceptional user experience.” The need for a better user experience is paramount. Over the next few years, the devices and software that we use in our work environments will evolve into something dramatically different. The question is: Will you keep up? Do you feel the strains of consumerization at your organization? Share your story in a comment below. Author’s Note: This is the second post in a series on major trends affecting the architecture, engineering, and environmental consulting industry.

The “Big” Shift: Mega Trends That Will Transform Your Consultancy

Javier Baldor
JavierBaldor
Executive Vice President
BST Global
Having time to sift through all of the new research, infographics, and buzz words is challenging. Everyday, there is an increasing amount of data being thrown at us. It’s hard to know what to tune into and what to tune out. To help you navigate through the sea of information, we’re launching a series of blog posts exploring the major trends that will transform your consultancy. Over the next few months, follow along with us as we take an in-depth look into how these developments will affect our future, both tomorrow and beyond. Trend One: THE "BIG" ShiFT We’ve seen it coming -- the “Big” Shift. This year, the Millennial generation is projected to surpass the outsized Baby Boom generation as the largest living generation. What’s more, they’ve also edged out Generation X to make up the largest share of the American workforce. This massive generational shift has big implications for the way we do business. Chances are you are already hiring Millennials, promoting them, and trying to figure out how to get them to stay. Millennials have a new set of expectations surrounding work. And, if we don’t shift our own practices, we will fall behind. Who are they? Millennials are the boom from the Baby Boomers. They are between the ages of 18 and 34, they are passionate, they are tech savvy, they love to share, and they are always connected. They are the first generation to be raised on mobile phones and the Internet. Not surprisingly, 87% of Millennials agree that their smartphone never leaves their side, night or day. What motivates them? In a recent Kleiner Perkins survey, Millennials selected their most valued work benefit – and the results may surprise you. Training and development placed first with 22% of the vote, followed by flexible working hours at 19%, and cash bonuses coming in at 14%. Additionally, managers and Millennials were both asked what the most important thing to Millennials is in terms of work. Thirty percent of Millennials indicated meaningful work as the most important thing to them, yet nearly half of their managers guessed it to be higher pay. This statistic is very telling — there is a big perception disconnect happening between Millennials and their managers. What do they expect? Millennials entering the industry have different expectations around work/life balance, availability of workplace environments, technological resources, and training that meet their standards of simplicity and flexibility. Flexibility  They expect flexible work hours and 32% believe they will be working ‘mainly flexible' hours in the future. Mobility They expect to be able to work from home, office, or cafes at will. The latest technology Millennials prefer to collaborate online at work as opposed to in-person or over the phone, and 45% use personal smartphones for work. Moreover, the consumer software Millennials use at home (think Apple, Google) influences their expectations at work. They expect a beautiful user experience and they want it on-the-go. This trend, called the Consumerization of Software, is important to recognize. Mentorship Millennials have very short tenures (just 2 years!) when compared to other generations which range from 5-10 years. Why? A recent Deloitte study cites one of the primary reasons Millennials seek change is a lack of personal benefit, growth, and mentorship. Of note, 71% of those likely to leave their job in the next two years are unhappy with the development of their leadership skills. What can you do?  Embrace the opportunity and find a way to connect with Millennials and leverage their talent and passion. Your growing workforce comes with different expectations, so it may be time to rethink your work environment.  Millennials want to collaborate, learn, and grow. They want to feel supported and valued. They want flexibility. Create an environment that fosters this and you will create a company where Millennials want to work, love to work, and stay for years. Millennials are, after all, the future of our industry. Ben Horowitz with 4B private equity firm Andreessen Horowitz said: "Younger people tend to be more innovative because they have fewer assumptions. They don't understand why things are the way they are. They don't understand why they have to hail a taxi... You get more innovation because of that." Has your company seen a shift in workforce? If so, share some of your best practices or lessons learned in a comment below! Author’s Note: This is the first in a series on major trends affecting the architecture, engineering, and environmental consulting industry.

The Six Key Ingredients of a Great Manager

Barry Lawrence
BarryLawrence
Group Director
BST Global
I have to admit it—I am a perfectionist. As an executive leader in my organization, I expect a great deal of my people. I expect us to innovate, to deliver with the highest quality, to be passionate, and to drive ourselves to exceed expectations. In short, perfection. The Oxford dictionary defines perfect as, "Having all the required or desirable elements, qualities, or characteristics; as good as it is possible to be. Free from any flaw or defect in condition or quality; faultless. Precisely accurate; exact. Highly suitable for someone or something; exactly right." It's a big word, perfection. I get that. It evokes connotations of grandeur and challenges our potential. What does perfect really mean to us? Can we expect it of our people? Can we actually achieve it? Short answer: How can we not? You Need Great Manager To be a great leader, you need to be the visionary, the dreamer, the change agent. But being a great leader does not necessarily mean you are great manager. According to Leadership and Management expert Markus Buckingham, “Great managers are not mini-executives waiting for leadership to be thrust upon them. Great leaders are not simply managers who have developed sophistication. The core activities of a manager and a leader are simply different.” To achieve greatness, or perfection even, you need to have someone else who will run point on the front lines. Someone you trust to represent you. Someone to work alongside you to make your vision a reality. A pragmatic, detailed-oriented someone, whose core skills, abilities, and passions are expertly honed for organizing, coordinating, motivating, collaborating, and communicating. The Key Ingredients Clearly, a great manager is someone that is highly qualified with the requisite "hard skills" and subject matter expertise. But, the hard skills are not the most important ingredient. What significantly differentiates great managers from good ones is how they engage. Great managers have the natural ability to learn quickly and have extraordinary aptitude. They are sponges that soak up and transfer the knowledge around them.  Managerial aptitude is not just about being smart, but also the ability to apply creative and critical thinking to problem solving. Great managers are chameleons that adapt effectively to their circumstances.  They have the uncanny ability to synthesize the variables and drive decisive action. From explaining an issue to an irate CEO, to talking a customer through a question, to jumping in hands-on with the team to get the work done. Great managers have integrity and value professional conduct. They are humble and egoless enough that no assignment is beneath their ability. They are also obsessive about quality, with a work hard/play hard ethic, and passion for getting the job done. Great managers value teamwork. They have the core ability to bring people together and work seamlessly with others. They put the needs of the team above themselves and allow the effectiveness and productivity of the team to outweigh the needs of any one individual. Great managers are fair. They have a knack for balancing loyalties between what is best for the company and what is good for the employee. They are highly respected and appreciated by their peers and subordinates. They are the ones people ask to work with. Their employees remember their birthdays and invite them to lunch. Their people often volunteer to work overtime when needed, versus having it mandated. Great managers have a softer side, but they are not pushovers. They also have a hard edge and know when and how they need to push their teams in order to achieve the desired results and outcomes. Great managers are disciplined. They are process junkies that continually establish, refine, and enforce process discipline in order to get reliable and repeatable results. If you do not have effective processes in place, great managers are the ones lobbying at the front of the line to get what is needed in place in order to ensure success. A Leader's Call to Action We can, and should, proudly expect greatness and perfection from our people, because to be quite frank, we expect it from ourselves. Expecting greatness means being great ourselves. It means holding ourselves to the same standard, being fair, and of course, leading by example. Do you have a great manager?  If not, perhaps it's time for you to take a hard look and raise the bar. If you do, what are they doing that separates them from the crowd, and how can we learn from their example?

People

The pervasiveness of mobile technologies has freed the modern workforce from the boundaries of the traditional office space. As professional resources disperse, along with their intellectual capital, companies must learn to facilitate collaboration, preserve company culture, and recruit new talent in a global marketplace.

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